Archive of ‘Ramadan & Eid’ category

49 Ways to get Kids Involved in Ramadan

One question I’ve seen floating around on social media a lot is ‘How do I get my kids involved in Ramadan?’, so I put together a post to answer this question. Involvement can mean a lot of things, it can mean creating, learning, doing, making or helping, it can also mean so much more. Essentially it is about including children and getting them to be and feel like they are a part of something and I think the ideas in this post will help you achieve that.

49 Ways to get kids involved in Ramadan blog



I had my 4 year old in mind when writing this, but there’s so many ideas in this post this could range from babies right up to children 10 years old. I’ve also included links to purchase items where relevant. So here they are, 49 Ways to get kids involved in Ramadan:

1. Let them help set the table for suhoor or iftar. 

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2. Make a Ramadan banner or poster.

3. Use a countdown calendar. Check out some of the printables below.

4. Or better yet, create your own.

Free Printable 30 Ramadan Activities (Large)



5. Have the kids help you decorate the house and set up a little Ramadan display with/for them.

6. Do Ramadan crafts.

  • Check out my my review for Craft it Up
  • Follow Ramadan Crafts on Instagram. they’re full of great ideas
  • I have a few more ideas in the Crafts section of the blog

7. Learn about the customs and traditions of Ramadan in other countries – a simple google search should bring up plenty.

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8. Make a sadaqah/charity box.

9. If you share some food/dates/info about Ramadan with your neighbours- take your kids along with you.

Ramadan Dear Neighbour Tags




10. Let them share Ramadan with their friends. 

Last year we made cookies to share, the recipe and free printables are here.

Mini MnM cookies for sharing



11. Use Ramadan activity books and sheets to keep them busy

12. Turn traditional Ramadan menu items into fun, kid friendly versions – this can be as simple as lowering the spice, cutting into fun shapes, or even offering a smaller serve.

13. Have a Ramadan party.

14. Create your own Ramadan story, if your child is too young, ask them to tell you about Ramadan in their own words and write down what they say. This will be a great keepsake for years to come.

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15. Read stories from the Quran.

16. Get your kids to create a gratitude list.

Ramadan is one of those times that we really appreciate all that we have. Why not get your kids to start their own gratitude list. They could write daily in a gratitude journal, or fill a jar with daily gratitude notes. If your children are too small to write, you can have them draw a picture, or write it for them.

17. Donate clothes and toys to those in need.

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18. Give your child money/coins to fill a charity box that you can drop off with them at the end of Ramadan or at a later stage.

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19. Wear traditional garments – if you have traditional garments in their size, get them to wear it for a day. This can be traditional cultural dress or even modest Islamic dress.

20. If your kids are old enough get/make a fast tracker and give rewards for completion. Praise and encouragement work just as well as a toy or lolly.

21. Get them involved in suhoor, if it’s too early for them wake up, let them have a ‘suhoor’ meal at breakfast time. Set the scene – do everything just as you would during suhoor so they can experience it and don’t forget to finish off with a date, some water and your intention to fast (just as a practise of course).

22. If your children are too young to fast, but are excited by the prospect of fasting, let them attempt a practise fast (this doesn’t have to be longer than a few hours, making sure you don’t force or push them to do so) . Offer praise for any attempt made, it will encourage them to fast when they are required to do so, in shaa Allah.

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23. Ask them to help choose their eid clothes- try to purchase these before Ramadan, or if you’re using existing clothes or are purchasing them yourself, get them to try them on before Eid, and ask them to get accessories ready (socks, shoes, belt, headbands, hair ties etc).

24. Get/make a salaah tracker and offer rewards for completing salaahs.

25. Learn a new surah – if your kids are old enough and able to memorise, try learning a surah with them. There are so many short surahs to choose from.

26. Play Quran recitation in your house. If possible incorporate the playing of Surahs that your children have memorised or are familiar with.

27. Set up an I’tikaf tent. Idea from How to get your kids to love Ramadan on Productive Muslim.

28. Search for the moon together and talk about its phases and what they symbolise in welcoming the Islamic month.

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29. Make food and cookies in fun islamic shapes. 

30. Encourage your children to perform simple sunnahs – or they can compete with themselves by setting a Sunnah goal and trying to beat it each day. This can be a great one to work on as a parent as well.

31. Encourage good deeds or make good deed sticks.

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32. Listen to islamic songs or Nasheeds (if you prefer instrument free, there’s a lot of options, if you look).

33. Increase knowledge together, watch (child appropriate) lectures on YouTube or put on some Islamic Children’s DVDs if you have them. 

  • Little explorer’s Australia is our current favourite.
  • We also own all the Zaky DVDs – Let’s Learn Quran with Zaky and Friends was played over and over again last Ramadan, I think we all know the words off by heart. Purchase through Amazon or in the 1Islam store. We plan to buy part 2 very soon in shaa Allah.

34. Create an iftar box – I saw this idea on Amnah’s (Little Life of Mine) Instagram last year. If your kids have started fasting or even if they’re doing part fasts, start an iftar box with them, it’s a great motivator to get to iftar time so they can enjoy all the treats they’ve packed.



Iftar box



35. Take them to the mosque when you can. If they’re up and can manage, take them for Taraweeh prayers one night.

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36. If you have special ramadan recipes, ask your kids to help you prepare them, be patient, it may take longer and be more messy than usual but they will enjoy the time with you.

37. If you’re having friends and family over for iftar, get the kids to help with the meal, to set up for the guests or help with the table.

38. Pack hampers for the disadvantaged/homeless and ask your kids to help you pack. Delegate tasks that will be simple and easy so they can be pleased with themselves and aspire to do more.

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39. Eat together on the floor – give the dining table a rest (or the kitchen nook as the case may be), throw a mat on the floor and enjoy your iftar Sunnah style.

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40. If you’re sharing Eid gifts, get your kids involved by getting them to help you make it if it’s homemade, or help you choose something of you’re making a purchase or they can help gift wrap and fill envelopes for you.

Eid Gift for Kids



41. Start a Ramadan Journal or scrapbook. It’s a great way to for them to keep track of each Ramadan, see how far they’ve come, track new achievements and set better goals each time. You can keep it simple and use a good old fashioned notebook and pen or try some of the options below:

42. Teach them about Layatul Qadr – change your routine in the last 10 days/nights and increase your worship so they recognise the  significance. 

43. If your children use an iPad or Tablet why not incorporate some Islamic/Ramadan Learning apps. 

44. Get your kids to help you plan your Eid decorations, and help you decorate when the time comes. 

45. Make a Dua list of simple and easy Duas to learn with your children. You can introduce the fasting Duas too.

46. Create Ramadan traditions with them. Some ideas below.

47. Let them experience iftar – start their dinner off with some water (Zam Zam would be great) and a date just as you would if you were breaking your fast before eating ‘dinner’.

48. Read Ramadan/Eid stories with them. We only have a few but I’m hoping to increase our collection this year.

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49. Encourage love for learning and reading Quran.

  • Read in front of your kids when possible
  • Try this Quran 30 day word activity Let’s find a word in the Quran
  • If they’re old enough and ready, get them books to learn Arabic alphabets
  • Also check out The Story of The Elephant by Shade 7 publishing purchase on Amazon
  • Teach them about when and how the Quran was revealed.

BONUS: Make it fun and lead by example! 



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Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links.

Ramadan Meal Planner

Hello everyone, I’ve decided to put together a free Ramadan meal planner for all of you. It has a simple layout and is easy to use. It has spaces for Suhoor, Iftar, Dinner and Snacks. I’ll be using the snack section to include lunch ideas for the cookie monster, can’t forgot our feasting kids.



Free Printable Ramadan Meal Planner



Yes I know Ramadan isn’t about the food. For me personally I’ve found that being organised during Ramadan means I spend less time fumbling in the kitchen, less time thinking about what to cook and less time in the grocery store. This means more time spent on prayer and worship (for me anyway).

I’ll be using this meal planner during Ramadan and in shaa Allah it helps me to keep on track. If you need some organisation too, feel free to download the planner. Just click here and print. And don’t worry, yours won’t have modestmunchies.com splashed across the middle 😉

The above planner was from 2014 and 2015 is below.



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Making up Missed Fasts

I recently read this article about making up fasts from Productive Muslim. I’ve been meaning to start making up my missed fasts and although I’m a bit late of the mark, starting now is better than not starting at all. I’ve missed fasts in previous years from being pregnant, breastfeeding and of course the usual missed fasts. While I make up a few each year, I never push myself hard enough and it’s always easy to forget until Ramadan rolls around again. We have just over a month before Ramadan and I’d like to make up as many as I can, I have 44. I know I won’t get close to finishing them all but I’d be happy if I knock off at least 10, if not more. My goal is to make at least the Sunnah fasts each week and then throw in a few others where I can manage.

Making Up Missed Fasts.



I know there is  a difference of opinion in regards to whether certain fasts are meant to be made up or paid the fidyah for. I recommend you discuss this with an Imam or learned scholar. From my knowledge the consensus is that pregnancy and breastfeeding fasts are meant to be made up as they are a temporary state, based on this I plan to make up all my missed fasts, even though they may be many in number. Again, please seek advice in regards to this matter.

We’re about to hit Winter here in Australia, so our days are short, a mere 12 hours of daylight. A perfect time to start making up fasts and I plan to continue after Ramadan as well. By posting it here quite publicly my hope is that it can help me stay on track and serve as the motivation I need. I know you may not all be in the same boat, and many of you reading this are in the throws of Summer with long hot days, babies and busyness but make a start, even if it’s just a few, it will good practise for Ramadan as well.

Whether you’ve got as many fasts as I do to make up (or more) from pregnancy, breastfeeding, from menstruation, sickness and general forgetfulness, just remember you can do it! Set your mind to it, set a goal and In Sha Allah you can knock them off. If you’d like to join me on this journey, I have a few things that might help us along the way.

I’ve started a Facebook group for support and motivation as well as some free printable trackers. If you’re joining me in the Facebook group I want you to get in there and tell everyone how many fasts you have left to make up (if you’re comfortable with sharing) and also set a goal of the number of fasts you want to complete before Ramadan. Keep the goal small and achievable. Hopefully, this will give you the support and encouragement you need to get started. If you’re a social media junkie and plan to post your suhoors, iftars or just anything in general related to this, feel free to use the hashtag #missedfastsclub. It will help us check in with each other as well as keep you motivated to keep going, in sha Allah.

I commissioned my cousin-in-law Aysha of Penny Paperoni to create these beautiful printables, these are yours to download for FREE. The printables include a Missed Fasts Tracker, a Missed Fasts calculation sheet and a Fasts Left print. You can easily download and print these with a single click at the end of this post. The printables are pretty clear, but I’ve included a little explanation of how to use each one at the end of the post.



Missed Fasts Tracker Free Printables Download



How to use your printables:



Example Missed Fasts Calculations



Missed Fasts Tracker – Calculations – this sheet is an ideal place to jot down and calculate your missed fasts over the year. Consider each year you have had missed fasts and all the reasons you would have missed them, then give each reason an approximate number. Don’t forget to tally it at the end. This reason and set out of this sheet was inspired by the post on Productive Muslim I mentioned earlier.



Example Missed Fasts Tracker (1)



Missed Fasts Tracker- the sheet gives slots for 38 fasts, I know not everyone has the same number of fasts but this seemed like an ideal number as a starting point (plus it fitted best on the page ;)). If you have less than 38 just scratch out the extras and use it from the number you need. Or make the blank sheet with your ideal number. If you have 38 fasts, awesome, you’re good to go. If you have more than 38 fasts, print out the sheet as well as a blank sheet and mark the extra numbers you require.



Example Fasts Left Print



You can do it _ Fasts left in sha Allah – this sheet makes such a cute printable to have on display (you may want to display it somewhere private though). Place it in a cute frame or laminate it and put it on a stand, use a dry erase marker to write in your number.

 

 

 

Penny Paperoni is launching soon, I’ll be sure to share all the details with you as soon as I have them. The printables are just beautiful so I know there’ll be more gorgeous prints coming our way.

Teddy Bear Hujjaj

Today we made teddy bear Hujjaj. It was an activity on our Hajj /Eid table. Chocolate shortbread, white chocolate Ihram! Yum, yum, yum! And yes, there’s a recipe. It’s such a fun activity to do with kids.



teddy bears hujjaj



Scroll down all the way to the end to see what our teddy bear Hujjaj got up to!

Teddy Bear Hujjaj

Yield: 34 cookies (5cm cookie cutter)

Ingredients

  • 1 cup flour
  • 125 g softened butter
  • 1 tsp vanilla essence
  • 1/4 cup cocoa
  • 1/2 cup corn flour
  • 1/2 cup icing sugar
  • 1/2 cup white chocolate

Instructions

Pre heat oven to 170c. Line a cookie sheet with baking paper. In a bowl of a mixer, throw in all your ingredients except the white chocolate and mix on a medium speed until it forms a dough. Flip onto a floured surface and roll to about 7mm thick. Use a teddy bear (or gingerbread men) cutter to cut out your hujjaj. The dough will be quite soft, slide a flat knife or spatula under the cookie and carefully place onto your cookie sheet. When all your dough is finished and cookies cut, use a toothpick to mark the eyes and nose. Place the sheet in the oven and bake for 10-15 minutes or until edges are crisp (the inside will firm up as it cools). Once cooled, melt white chocolate in the microwave. Fill into ziplock bags and decorate away.

http://modestmunchies.com/teddy-bear-hujjaj/

We did the eyes and nose while the cookies were still hot from the oven, I had forgotten to do them prior to baking. Doing it before will give you a cleaner finish. Or you could use white chocolate dots to do the eyes and nose like we did for some instead.

I absolutely couldn’t resist so I made this video! Isn’t it the cutest teddy bear Hajj video you’ve ever seen? (It has to be, right? How many of those are even out there?)

Hajj / Eid Lolly Countdown Calendar

Ok, ok! I know I said I was trying to move away from giving lollies in these things, but come on, the cookie monster is 3!! THREE I tell you, and what doesn’t excite a 3 year old more than lollies? I know it’s not the greatest for their teeth or their tummies, but he barely has any sweet things at all. Have I pleaded my case yet?

Also, this post is late, *hangs head in shame*, what’s a mum to do? There’s still time to make this though, or just save this idea for next year.

I wanted this calendar to be fun for him, and I’m doing that in a few ways. Last year I did this as a poster with lollies and activities in the pockets, this year I’m doing that as part of a Hajj/Eid table (post coming soon) as well as this lolly countdown calendar. It’s pretty simple, all you need is a 12 whole muffin pan, craft or gift wrapping paper, tape and some lollies/candy to fill them with. You don’t have to follow my lead and go with a lolly filled one like I have, you could fill it with whatever you like.



Hajj Eid Lolly Countdown Calendar



I filled each cup, then covered with gift wrap and taped down the edges. If you’re concerned about insects or anything else, then wrap each one individually. With a marker, I numbered each covered section. I had to skip #10, the day of Eid al Adha, it got squished in between the rows. There’s just no other way to make the calendar work, unless there’s a 13 whole muffin pan out there, plus I’m sure there’ll be plenty of treats on Eid day anyway.

Don’t forget to check out my last post 29+ Ideas for Hajj at Home for Kids for some added inspiration.

29+ Ideas for Hajj at home with kids

There’s only a few days left before Dhul Hijjah rolls around and I’ve been feeling a bit uninspired to create something for this years activities with the cookie monster. So I took to the internet to get some much needed inspiration and thought why not share my findings with you. Here are my 29+ ideas for Hajj at home WITH kids.



29+ Ideas fror Hajj at Home with Kids.



Hajj Crafts and activities:
Let’s kick this post off with some Hajj craft and activity ideas.

1.  Cardboard and felt Kabah and Hajj layout by OumZaza



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Post and image source. (Link in french)

2.  A Hajj Diarama/storyboard from Rawdah tul Ilm



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Post and Image source.

3. These Hajj day by day printables from Islamic Bulletin Board are great, just print them off and you have an easy, simple way to explain Hajj to the kids. Check out their site for other great Islamic printables.



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Post and Image source.

4. I adore the look of this Hajj poster from the Muslim Learning Garden. So cute and crafty. Full instructions are on their page.



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Post and Image source.

5. They also have this lego Hajj Diorama. Definitely something to think about including this year, especially since the cookie monster is into Lego building at the moment (we’re still on the Duplos). I just wonder if he has enough black blocks.



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Post and Image source.

6. If not with Lego, then make make your own Kabah out of a milk carton. This is such a handy tutorial from With a Spin.



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Post and Image source.

7. You could also make Eid/Hajj cards for friends, family or even neighbours. This pop up card from Jasmine and Co is such a neat idea.



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Post and Image source.

8. If you’re busy, like we all are, why not purchase something. Most of the hard work is done for you in this Hajj kit from Hafsa Creates. It’s been created with the intention of teaching children about Hajj, it comes marked and labelled so all you have to do is assemble.



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Kit can be purchased here.

9. Set up a little Hajj play area during Dhul Hijjah like this creative one from Muslim Kid Genius on Facebook. I just love the minion in Ihram.



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Muslims Kid Genius on Facbook. Image from Pinterest.

10. Create an advent calendar, like this Hajj Advent Calendar, from yours truly. It’s a good way to get the really little ones excited about Hajj, even when they don’t understand much (I did this with the cookie monster when he was just over 2.5 years old).



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11. We made footprints as an activity in our calendar. Yes, I know it seems a little odd as a Hajj craft, but you can read about why and how it relates in my last post.



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12. Get your friends or family together and have a mock Hajj like Confessions of a Muslim Mommaholic. Letting kids experience things for themselves is a great way to get them involved and learning.



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Image and Post Source.

13. This idea had me excited, I love learning that crosses subjects. Look at these Hajj learning cards that includes numbers and number sense.



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Image and Post Source.

14. Little sheep crafts seem to be all the craze at this time of year. Check out my post with a free printable sheep and tags that you can use to hand out before Eid.


Eid Sheep Craft Printables





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This little guy was made by Life of a MOMpreneur, Post and Image source

 

 

Hajj books and other reading resources:

15. The story of the elephant – Pop up book by Shade 7 Limited
This is a great book for children to learn about some of the history of the Kabah.
Some additional information from the author.

The Story of The Elephant, Surah Al-Feel Pop-up & Play Book has a direct relation to Hajj in the story as it is the answering of Ibrahim (AS’s) dua that keeps the Kaba with us today. The story at the end also refers to Umrah and Hajj to teach children that millions of Muslims go there for pilgrimage every year



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That pop up Kabah in the book is just delightful.

16. Noor Kids go to Hajj
This book discusses some key aspects of Hajj, through an enjoyable comic like story. It includes scientific concepts, terms, questions to ask kids and much more.



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17. Going to Mecca by Naima B Roberts
I don’t have a copy nor have I read this book myself, but it seems like a great book to give children an insight into the pilgrimage.



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18. There’s also this one called The Kabah by Shaida Gutta. It is such a cute book, I’ll have to get my hands on a copy.



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 19. You can find a a great explanation on the Muslim Kid’s Digest site, What is Hajj? Or check out their new Hajj page, with great resources, specifically aimed at kids.



Learn about dhul Hijjah and the Hajj with MKD



Videos:

20. This is a really great video about the 5 Pillars and Hajj. This was played constantly last Ramadan (2013) and my son loved it. It’s also really informative and a great one to share with non muslims.

 

21. For older kids or even adults this is a great video explanation from National Geographic. Video here.

Hajj/Eid Decorations:
A big part of celebrating and making things special for your kids is the decorations, have a look at some of these.

22. How about making a sheep pinata for an Eid party. Or even just for the kids on Eid day. I’m sure that would bring big smiles to their faces (especially if it’s filled with loads of lollies).



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Post and image source. (Link in French)

23. Or what about these cute Eid Sheep come from Ode to Inspiration.



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Post and image source.

24. I love this look of these decorations created for an Umrah Party from Little Life of Mine.. Black and gold just looks so classy, and I am totally in love with that paper plate Kabah.



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Image and post source.

25. In keeping with the black and gold theme, here’s more decoration ideas for a Hajj/Eid party from Time to Partay. I just love the Kabah favour boxes. It’s always nice to give a little something to your guests when they leave.



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Post and Image source.

26. Even if you’re not having an Eid party I’m sure you want some ideas for handing out treats to loved ones. Have a look at these ideas from Little Life of Mine.



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Post and Image source.

28. If all else fails you could always make a Kabah cake.

This is one of the sweetest Ka’bah cakes I’ve seen.



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Image Source.

Or this one. Look at that detail.



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Image Source.

29. You can make Eid chocolates, candy or anything you can put in a Mold with these, from Eid Molds. My friend Salam Mama and Life of a Mompreneur turned me onto them. I’ll have to remember to purchase some for next year.



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Image Source.

Or how about some sheep cupcakes? Check out my tutorial, video and recipe here.


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If all that inspiration wasn’t enough, here’s more ideas.

Check out the Hajj for Kids on Productive Muslim by Hafsa of Hafsa Creates.

There’s also this post from Confessions of a Muslim Mommaholic with photos of her Hajj activities of years gone by. The green felt Kabah poster was the inspiration for my Hajj Advent Calendar. 

Don’t forget to follow me on Pinterest, I have a group Hajj board which I’m sure will be filled with more ideas.

I hope you’re feeling inspired after this, I certainly am.

Edit: After this post went live, I found a few more great resources for teaching kids about Eid. There’s Sharing Eid ul Adha with Kids from My Halal Kitchen and 10 Different ways to Teach your Kids about Eid al Adha from The Muslimah Mommy.

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